Category Archives: Microchipping

Companies Start Implanting Microchips Into Workers’ Bodies

The Associated Press reports:

Image result for Companies Start Implanting Microchips Into Workers' BodiesThe syringe slides in between the thumb and index finger. Then, with a click, a microchip is injected in the employee’s hand. Another “cyborg” is created.

What could pass for a dystopian vision of the workplace is almost routine at the Swedish start-up hub Epicenter. The company offers to implant its workers and start-up members with microchips the size of grains of rice that function as swipe cards: to open doors, operate printers or buy smoothies with a wave of the hand.

“The biggest benefit, I think, is convenience,” said Patrick Mesterton, co-founder and chief executive of Epicenter. As a demonstration, he unlocks a door merely by waving near it. “It basically replaces a lot of things you have, other communication devices, whether it be credit cards or keys.”

The technology itself is not new: Such chips are used as virtual collar plates for pets, and companies use them to track deliveries. But never before has the technology been used to tag employees on a broad scale. Epicenter and a handful of other companies are the first to make chip implants broadly available.

And as with most new technologies, it raises security and privacy issues. Although the chips are biologically safe, the data they generate can show how often employees come to work or what they buy. Unlike company swipe cards or smartphones, which can generate the same data, people cannot easily separate themselves from the chips.

READ MORE…

Microchips Implanted Under The Skin Of Office Workers

Microchips Will Be Implanted Into Healthy People Sooner Than You Think

Dina Spector writes for Business Insider:

‘In March 2009, British researcher Mark Gasson had a chip injected under the skin of his hand. The chip, a slightly more advanced version of the tags used to track pets, turned Gasson into a walking swipe-card. With a wave of his wrist, he could open security doors at the University of Reading laboratory, where his experiment was being conducted, and he could unlock his cell phone just by cradling it.

A year later, Gasson infected his own implant with a computer virus, one that he could pass on to other computer systems if the building’s networks were programmed to read his chip. As Gasson breezed around the the workplace, spreading the virus and corrupting computer systems, certain areas of the building became inaccessible to his colleagues. At the time of the experiment, theoretical physicist and author of “The Future of the Mind” Michio Kaku told FOX News that demonstrating the ability to spread infection was an “important point” because “we’re going to have more chips in our body and clothing.”

Thousands of Americans already have implanted medical devices, including pacemakers, which are inserted into the chest to treat abnormal heart rhythms, and cochlear implants, which help deaf people to hear. But the future, Gasson says, is going to focus on implantable technology for healthy people. Part of the reason is that we continually look for ways to make our lives easier. The question is whether we’re willing accept both the unintended and unknown consequences that come with giving up partial control of our bodies to technology.’

READ MORE…

New Zealand school plans microchip bracelets to encourage “good behaviour”

Fairfax Media reports:

‘A North Canterbury school’s plan to fit students with microchip bracelets to track their behaviour has prompted concern among parents.

Swannanoa School wants to use silicon bracelets as part of a scheme to reward good behaviour, minutes from a Parent Teacher Association meeting show. Teachers would use portable scanners to add points to a student’s online good behaviour chart with a reward when a certain amount of points was accumulated.

The school says the scheme would cost $7000 to set up. The proposal has been opposed by some parents. The Ministry of Education said it did not recommend the bracelets and would expect broad parent support before it was adopted by the school.’

READ MORE…

To Increase Productivity, UPS Monitors Drivers’ Every Move

Jacob Goldstein reports for NPR:

A typical UPS truck is tracked by hundreds of sensors.‘UPS is using technology in ways that may soon be common throughout the economy. On the surface, UPS trucks look the same as they did more than 20 years ago, when Bill Earle started driving for the company in rural Pennsylvania. But underneath the surface, Earle says, the job has changed a lot. The thing you sign your name on when the UPS guy gives you a package used to be a piece of paper. Now it’s a computer that tells Earle everything he needs to know. The computer doesn’t just give advice. It gathers data all day long.

Earle’s truck is also full of sensors that record to the second when he opens or closes the door behind him, buckles his seat belt and when he starts the truck. Technology means that no matter what kind of job you have — even if you’re alone in a truck on an empty road — your company can now measure everything you do. In Earle’s case, those measurements go into a little black box in the back of his truck. At the end of the day, the data get sent to Paramus, N.J., where computers crunch through the data from UPS trucks across the country.’

READ MORE…

Human microchipping: I’ve got you under my skin

Iain Gillespie writes for The Sydney Morning Herald:

Professor Kevin Warwick and his Cybernetic Arm. Photo: REXThousands of technology enthusiasts use it as the ultimate app, enabling them to lock and unlock their homes, cars, computers and mobile phones with a simple wave of a hand. But there’s a catch: they must have a microchip inserted into their bodies. The idea may seem weird, and painful, but human microchipping appears to appeal not only to amateurs, who call themselves biohackers, but also to governments, police forces, medical authorities and security companies.

It involves using a hypodermic needle to inject an RFID (radio-frequency identification) microchip, the size of a grain of rice, usually into the person’s hand or wrist. The same kind of chip is used for tracking lost pets. The implants send a unique ID number that can be used to activate devices such as phones and locks, and can link to databases containing limitless information, including personal details such as names, addresses and health records. RFID chips are everywhere.

READ MORE…

Motorola patents e-tattoo that can read your thoughts by listening to unvocalized words in your throat

E-tattooFrom Extreme Tech:

Imagine trying to patent the smartphone, or for that matter, the tattoo. Any company that could swing that, could probably also patent the fork and knife. Incredibly, a new application from Google-owned Motorola Mobility [just sold to Lenovo] seeks a patent not for any particular utensil, but rather, for setting the table. In other words, if you have an electronic smart tattoo, and want it to speak to your mobile communications device, you may soon be able to do it in spades, but you will have to do it Google style.

But hold on for a minute, as there is a bit more to the whole concept than might first appear. The tattoo they have in mind is actually one that will be emblazoned over your vocal cords to intercept subtle voice commands — perhaps even subvocal commands, or even the fully internal whisperings that fail to pluck the vocal cords when not given full cerebral approval. One might even conclude that they are not just patenting device communications from a patch of smartskin, but communications from your soul.

Or maybe not. It has been known for decades that when you speak to yourself in your inner voice, your brain still sends neural spike volleys to your vocal apparatus, in a similar fashion to when you actually speak aloud. The main difference between the two, is that the nervous action driving covert speech as it is called, is subthreshold, and does not generate the full muscle contraction. The same might also be said for imagining throwing a baseball — it is probably not possible to even do so without simultaneously calling up and at least partially launching unamplified motor programs. Stated another way, your thoughts are your motor intentions, only they are not always recognizable as such if they are sufficiently abstracted.

READ MORE…

Chuck Schumer proposes law to put tracking devices on autistic children

From NY Daily News:

U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer wants to outfit autistic kids with tracking devices. Schumer (D-N.Y.) is planning to unveil “Avonte’s Law” on Sunday, a day after 14-year-old Avonte Oquendo was laid to rest. The autistic teen disappeared from his school Oct. 4. His remains were found Jan. 16.

The senator wants to expand an existing voluntary program for people suffering with Alzheimer’s to include autistic children. Schumer first raised the idea in November when the autistic teen from Queens was still missing.

The tracking devices could be attached to wristwatches, affixed to ankle bracelets, clipped on belts, or woven into shoelaces. “The program would be completely voluntary for parents and run by local law enforcement,” a release from Schumer’s office said.

Dangerous Things’ xNT: a personal NFC chip in your hand

The xNT is an implantable NFC chip that allows you to unlock doors, your phone and compute with just your hand.From The Guardian:

Produced by biohacking and NFC-firm Dangerous Things, the xNT is the world’s first NFC-compliant radio frequency identity tag that can be implanted inside your body.

Measuring 2 x 12mm the NFC tag is encased in a biologically resistant glass capsule and is looking for $8,000 in funding on Indiegogo to start mass production, with pledges of $99 and up winning you your very own xNT pre-loaded into an injection tube ready for implantation.

NFC works by emitting a low power radio-frequency signature that can be recognised by sensors, which can then trigger pre-programmed events. NFC is currently used by mobile devices for one-tap Bluetooth pairing, as well as the transfer of photos and even payments.

Once implanted in your hand, the NFC chip can be programmed for just about anything, including opening locks, starting your car, unlocking your computer or phone, or as a one-tap digital business card.

READ MORE…

Wearable computing is here already: How hi-tech got under our skin

From The Independent:

[…] Wristbands, watches and glasses are just the beginning. Next-generation wearables will be part of the fabric of our clothes – literally. London-based CuteCircuit has developed a mobile phone dress with an antenna in the seam and the SIM card in the label. Artist and designer Dominic Wilcox’s No Place Like Home shoes use GPS and LED lights to give directions.

These are concepts, not commercial products, but compared with what’s coming, they seem crude. Research published in 2011 by a team of scientists from Italy, France and the US explored the possibilities of using conductive thread – cotton coated in nanoparticles and polymers – to form transistors and circuits. Instead of wearing a dress with a computer built-in, your dress will be the computer.

Sabine Seymour, founder of Moondial, an agency that develops and consults on wearables, says: “We forget that we constantly wear a textile on our body. If we use that assumption that a consumer is covered everyday, we have a fantastic surface where we can embed a lot of functionality.”

She foresees smart clothes that change colour, regulate our temperature, charge the gadgets we carry and don’t need to be washed. Wearable computers and smart clothes are fine, but what about simply having the technology surgically implanted in your body? Instead of glasses, imagine if your retina had a display built-in. Consider an activity tracker implanted in your foot, or a tooth-filling sensor that vibrates when you have a message. Embedded technology has been used in medicine for decades. Pacemakers and cochlear implants were first developed in the 1960s.

More recently, work has begun on sensors that can be swallowed to monitor the effect of medical treatment and disposable monitoring patches that can be attached to the body. There is a difference between medical implants, which are often the best way to deal with a health problem, and lifestyle implants – but there’s no reason to think there won’t be demand for the latter. Many people already modify their bodies with tattoos, piercings and cosmetic surgery.

SEE ALSO: